Coulomb’s Law


Two stationary electric charges repel or attract each other with a force proportional to the product of the magnitude of charge and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them

F\quad \alpha { \quad }{ q }_{ 1 }{ q }_{ 2 } ;

F\quad \alpha { \quad }\frac { 1 }{ r^{ 2 } } ;

F=C\frac { { q }_{ 1 }{ q }_{ 2 } }{ { r }^{ 2 } }

F=\frac { 1 }{ 4\pi \epsilon } \frac { { q }_{ 1 }{ q }_{ 2 } }{ { r }^{ 2 } }

\epsilon ={ \epsilon }_{ 0 }{ \epsilon }_{ r }

For free space           F=\frac { 1 }{ 4\pi {\epsilon }_{0}} \frac { { q }_{ 1 }{ q }_{ 2 } }{ { r }^{ 2 } }    

       where C is the proportionality constant. The value of C depends upon the medium of the charges. Where { \epsilon }_{ 0 }  is permittivity of the free space, { \epsilon }_{ r } called relative permittivity or dielectric constant of the medium the value is =8.85*10-12 coulomb2 / newton-meter2,

For the medium:      F=\frac { 1 }{ 4\pi { \epsilon } } \frac { { q }_{ 1 }{ q }_{ 2 } }{ { r }^{ 2 } }

     

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